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7 Ways to Make Your Faith Portable

So your relationship with Jesus means something to you on Sunday but can you bring it with you on Monday?

This is of course THE question that haunts most Christians each Sunday as they leave church.  The problem isn't the gravity of the question but the fact that so many believers don't realize that their faith is portable.

You can take it with you, even if it means to work.

Here are my seven simple ways to bring your faith with you to work:

 

  1. Begin your day in prayer, asking God to keep you on the calm and confident path.  Nothing beats a good quiet time in the morning.  
  2. Begin every commute with a prayer.  Take a breath, close your eyes and ask for God's safety during your ride.
  3. Bless yourself whenever you pass by a Christian church.  Thank God for His presence there and in the lives of those that worship there.
  4. Use a pocket device to trigger on-the-fly prayers.  A small cross, a rock, a rosary- whatever will trigger your mind and heart to pray is good.  Think of how many times during the day that you put your hands in your pockets, etc.
  5. Take a break during the day... with God.  Whether at lunch or in your walk around the building, spend time with God and process the past hour or two of your work.  Imagine you're having a chat with a trusted friend.
  6. Tell someone that you'll pray for them.  After all, you didn't expect to just keep your faith to yourself did you?
  7. Decompress on your route home.  I like to stop at an Episcopalian church parking lot on my way home.  This puts just the right amount of margin between me and being fully present at home.

Your faith is too important to leave at Church.  Let's encourage one another as we keep opening the doors to God at home and at work.

Question: Why is it so difficult to think of God in the midst of a busy day?

Photo courtesy of PS

Merry Christmas!

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